Top 10 Discussable Books of 2019

I love love LOVE book clubs, and it can be difficult to find books that can both grab readers and spur good dialogue between members.

Are you looking for a good book for your book club or for a buddy read? Look no farther-here are my top 10 favorite books of the year that can lead to great, in-depth discussions!


Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Summary: Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland.

Three Words: worldly, illuminating, dazzling

Readalikes: In the Midst of Winter by Isabel Allende, Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams, Swing Time by Zadie Smith


Killers of the Flower Moon: the Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

Summary: In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.

Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. Her older sister was shot. Her mother was then slowly poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances.

In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes such as Al Spencer, “the Phantom Terror,” roamed – virtually anyone who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll surpassed more than twenty-four Osage, the newly created F.B.I. took up the case, in what became one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations. But the bureau was then notoriously corrupt and initially bungled the case. Eventually the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to try to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only Native American agents in the bureau. They infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest modern techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most sinister conspiracies in American history.

Three Words: enlightening, brutal, lesser-known

Readalikes: The Ghosts of Eden Park by Karen Abbott, Unquiet Grave by Steve Hendricks, BlackKklansman by Ron Stallworth


Good Talk by Mira Jacob

Summary: “Who taught Michael Jackson to dance?” 
“Is that how people really walk on the moon?”
“Is it bad to be brown?” 
“Are white people afraid of brown people?”

Like many six-year-olds, Mira Jacob’s half-Jewish, half-Indian son, Z, has questions about everything. At first they are innocuous enough, but as tensions from the 2016 election spread from the media into his own family, they become much, much more complicated. Trying to answer him honestly, Mira has to think back to where she’s gotten her own answers: her most formative conversations about race, color, sexuality, and, of course, love. 

“How brown is too brown?”
“Can Indians be racist?”
“What does real love between really different people look like?”

Written with humor and vulnerability, this deeply relatable graphic memoir is a love letter to the art of conversation—and to the hope that hovers in our most difficult questions.

Three Words: thought-provoking, uncomfortable, necessary

Readalikes: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehesi Coates, I Was Their American Dream by Malaka Gharib, German Calendar No December by Sylvia Ofili


The Leavers by Lisa Ko

Summary: One morning, Deming Guo’s mother, an undocumented Chinese immigrant named Polly, goes to her job at the nail salon and never comes home. No one can find any trace of her.

With his mother gone, eleven-year-old Deming is left with no one to care for him. He is eventually adopted by two white college professors who move him from the Bronx to a small town upstate. They rename him Daniel Wilkinson in their efforts to make him over into their version of an “all-American boy.” But far away from all he’s ever known, Daniel struggles to reconcile his new life with his mother’s disappearance and the memories of the family and community he left behind.

Set in New York and China, The Leavers is a vivid and moving examination of borders and belonging. It’s the story of how one boy comes into his own when everything he’s loved has been taken away–and how a mother learns to live with the mistakes of her past.

Three Words: heartbreaking, intricate, empathetic

Readalikes: We Never Asked for Wings by Vanessa Diffenbaugh, Searching for Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok, Across a Green Ocean by Wendy Lee


Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe

Summary: In 2014, Maia Kobabe, who uses e/em/eir pronouns, thought that a comic of reading statistics would be the last autobiographical comic e would ever write. At the time, it was the only thing e felt comfortable with strangers knowing about em. Now, Gender Queer is here. Maia’s intensely cathartic autobiography charts eir journey of self-identity, which includes the mortification and confusion of adolescent crushes, grappling with how to come out to family and society, bonding with friends over erotic gay fanfiction, and facing the trauma of pap smears. Started as a way to explain to eir family what it means to be nonbinary and asexual, Gender Queer is more than a personal story: it is a useful and touching guide on gender identity–what it means and how to think about it–for advocates, friends, and humans everywhere.

Three Words: eye-opening, coming-of-age, introspective

Readalikes: The Bride Was a Boy by Chii, Tomboy by Liz Prince, Wandering Son by Takako Shimura


A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Summary: A Place for Us unfolds the lives of an Indian-American Muslim family, gathered together in their Californian hometown to celebrate the eldest daughter, Hadia’s, wedding – a match of love rather than tradition. It is here, on this momentous day, that Amar, the youngest of the siblings, reunites with his family for the first time in three years. Rafiq and Layla must now contend with the choices and betrayals that lead to their son’s estrangement – the reckoning of parents who strove to pass on their cultures and traditions to their children; and of children who in turn struggle to balance authenticity in themselves with loyalty to the home they came from.

In a narrative that spans decades and sees family life through the eyes of each member, A Place For Us charts the crucial moments in the family’s past, from the bonds that bring them together to the differences that pull them apart. And as siblings Hadia, Huda, and Amar attempt to carve out a life for themselves, they must reconcile their present culture with their parent’s faith, to tread a path between the old world and the new, and learn how the smallest decisions can lead to the deepest of betrayals

Three Words: layered, stunning, familial

Readalikes: The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri, Commonwealth by Ann Patchett, A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum


There There by Tommy Orange

Summary: We all came to the powwow for different reasons. The messy, dangling threads of our lives got pulled into a braid–tied to the back of everything we’d been doing all along to get us here. There will be death and playing dead, there will be screams and unbearable silences, forever-silences, and a kind of time-travel, at the moment the gunshots start, when we look around and see ourselves as we are, in our regalia, and something in our blood will recoil then boil hot enough to burn through time and place and memory. We’ll go back to where we came from, when we were people running from bullets at the end of that old world. The tragedy of it all will be unspeakable, that we’ve been fighting for decades to be recognized as a present-tense people, modern and relevant, only to die in the grass wearing feathers.

Three Words: upfront, multigenerational, exposing

Readalikes: Love Medicine by Louise Erdich, Where the Dead Sit Talking by Brandon Hobson, The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea


The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That Changed Their Lives by Dashka Slater

Summary: One teenager in a skirt.
One teenager with a lighter.
One moment that changes both of their lives forever.

If it weren’t for the 57 bus, Sasha and Richard never would have met. Both were high school students from Oakland, California, one of the most diverse cities in the country, but they inhabited different worlds. Sasha, a white teen, lived in the middle-class foothills and attended a small private school. Richard, a black teen, lived in the crime-plagued flatlands and attended a large public one. Each day, their paths overlapped for a mere eight minutes. But one afternoon on the bus ride home from school, a single reckless act left Sasha severely burned, and Richard charged with two hate crimes and facing life imprisonment. The case garnered international attention, thrusting both teenagers into the spotlight.

Three Words: revealing, well-researched, complex

Readalikes: Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin, Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin, October Mourning by Lesléa Newman


They Called Us Enemy by George Takei, Justin Eisinger, Steven Scott, & Harmony Becker

Summary: Long before George Takei braved new frontiers in Star Trek, he woke up as a four-year-old boy to find his own birth country at war with his father’s — and their entire family forced from their home into an uncertain future.

In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten “relocation centers,” hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard.

They Called Us Enemy is Takei’s firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother’s hard choices, his father’s faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future.

Three Words: eye-opening, critical, disheartening

Readalikes: Belonging by Nora Krug, March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell, Uprooted by Albert Marrin


On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Summary: Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least make it out of her neighborhood one day. As the daughter of an underground rap legend who died before he hit big, Bri’s got big shoes to fill. But now that her mom has unexpectedly lost her job, food banks and shutoff notices are as much a part of Bri’s life as beats and rhymes. With bills piling up and homelessness staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it—she has to make it.

On the Come Up is Angie Thomas’s homage to hip-hop, the art that sparked her passion for storytelling and continues to inspire her to this day. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; of the struggle to become who you are and not who everyone expects you to be; and of the desperate realities of poor and working-class black families.

Three Words: authentic, vocal, heavy

Readalikes: Gravity by Sarah Deming, Let Me Hear a Rhyme by Tiffany D. Jackson, Rani Patel in Full Effect by Sonia Patel


What have been some of your favorite discussable books you’ve read this year, or books you’ve read with a book club? Put them in the comments below!

Until next time…

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